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Enterprise Advisors

As part of BPS Birmingham’s work as a supply partner for the Careers and Enterprise Company’s operations in the GBSLEP area we will recruit at least 10 Enterprise Advisors from within the region’s professional services sector who will be matched with a school to work strategically with the school’s senior leadership team to raise the bar on delivering quality careers advice and guidance for all pupils. At the heart of the programme is better coordination amongst stakeholders and matching resources with the greatest needs across the region.

 

Latest Vacancy

A Smaller than average 11–18 Academy in the Highgate area of Birmingham judged as Outstanding by Ofsted. Almost all pupils come from minority ethnic groups and the large majority speak English as an additional language. Three quarters of pupils are eligible for pupil premium, which provides additional funding for looked after children and those known to be eligible for free school meals. The proportion of disadvantaged pupils is therefore well above the national average. The majority of the academy’s pupils are boys and in some year groups only 30% are girls.

Careers education is well established and the current coordinator is looking to train a younger member of staff to take on more careers’ responsibilities. The Enterprise Adviser could have a key role in supporting this member of staff with a specific focus on Key Stage 3 (11 – 14 year olds). No specific sector requested.

 

For more details, please contact Enterprise Coordinator Hilary Smyth-Allen

hilary@bpsbirmingham.co.uk

Could you be an Enterprise Adviser for

SCHOOL #6

A good school for 11- 16 year olds, where careers is a recognised priority, particularly in relation to post-16 destinations. They have established links to a wide range of employers, but would like to build up the provision in relation to self-employment and enterprise, promoting alternative career routes for girls and thinking beyond the local community.

This school would be a good match for:

– Somebody in South Birmingham
– Someone to develop the careers adviser to think about different ways of providing encounters.
– Have an interest in other sectors and extending their networks

SCHOOL #7

An alternative provision free school for 11-16 year olds in the Northfield area of Birmingham.  The school was established by a network of secondary schools who wanted to transform the learning experience and outcomes of students who do not thrive in a mainstream setting. It has a bespoke curriculum which is based around helping students gain qualifications in English, Maths, Science and ICT, alongside vocational options.

While the school has good careers advice and guidance for the young people it wants to provide opportunities for employers to motivate and inspire the young people many of whom are at risk of not engaging in education employment or training.

SCHOOL #8

A fully comprehensive, high-performing 11-16 Academy in South East Birmingham for learners of all abilities. Approximately 900 students on roll, it is a Fully Accessible Mainstream School with a long tradition of catering for physically disabled children.
It is a diverse school in every sense. As well as a Disability ‘specialism’, it is multi-ethnic with approximately 55% of the student body coming from homes where English may not be the first spoken language. 38% of young people attract Pupil Premium funding. A majority of students live within walking distance of the school.
Priorities include:
• Follow up sessions to careers fairs – more in depth exploration
• CV workshop with Employers
• Self-Employment
• Labour Market Information
• Girls into STEM
• Focus on medical, teaching, creative while raising awareness of opportunities in other sectors

SCHOOL #9

A smaller than average 11–18 Academy in the Highgate area of Birmingham judged as Outstanding by Ofsted. Almost all pupils come from minority ethnic groups and the large majority speak English as an additional language. Three quarters of pupils are eligible for pupil premium, which provides additional funding for looked after children and those known to be eligible for free school meals. The proportion of disadvantaged pupils is therefore well above the national average. The majority of the academy’s pupils are boys and in some year groups only 30% are girls.

Careers is well established and the current coordinator is looking to train a junior member of staff to take on more careers responsibilities. The Enterprise Adviser could have a key role in supporting this member of staff with a specific focus on Key Stage 3 (11 – 14 year olds). No specific sector requested.

SCHOOL #10

A multi-cultural, inclusive 11-18 Girls’ comprehensive school situated on the eastern side of the City of Birmingham. 840 students on roll including 200 plus Sixth Form students. The school has a specialism in Business Enterprise and Applied Learning as well as a focus on languages. The curriculum has been redesigned to deliver as many lessons in or of French as students have in English. Opportunities to showcase languages in careers would enhance this work.
The school has a qualified careers adviser and organises a number and variety of activities for its students. Priorities include:
• Parental Engagement
• Work with SEN cohort
• Promotion of Degree Apprenticeships
• Construction, Hospitality, HR/Marketing, Creative/Media sectors

SCHOOL #11

A larger than the average Academy in the Sutton Trinity area of Birmingham.
The proportion of students known to be eligible for free school meals is average, as is the percentage of students from minority ethnic groups and the academy is part of a multi-academy trust
Current priorities include raising awareness of different sectors and apprenticeships

SCHOOL #12

A smaller than average academy in the Quinton area, south of the city. The school converted to become an academy in April 2013 and is sponsored by the Academies Enterprise Trust. The majority of pupils are from minority ethnic groups and an above-average proportion of pupils speak English as an additional language. Pupils enter the school with starting points significantly lower than the national average. A large majority of pupils are disadvantaged and eligible for the additional funding of the pupil premium. Priorities include:
• LMI
• Business visits
• Science, technology, NHS construction sectors

SCHOOL #13

Large school with sixth form in Hodge Hill district, east of Birmingham judged Good by Ofsted and recently converted to become an all-through school. Part of a multi academy trust with 2 local secondary and 2 primary schools. The proportion of pupils eligible for Pupil Premium is twice the national average. Also the proportion of students from minority ethnic groups is four times the national average and many speak English as an additional language.

The school has well established links with a number of businesses but wants to coordinate it to ensure more young people benefit. The aim is to improve the delivery of careers through curriculum subjects. Other priorities include: parental engagement and increasing awareness of the wider range of opportunities available.

SCHOOL #14

A smaller than average secondary school for girls south of the city judged Good by Ofsted. Most students are  British with a below-average proportion of minority ethnic students or those who speak English as an additional language. The proportion of students known to be eligible for the pupil premium is above average. Priorities include:

  • LMI information
  • Enterprise activities
  • Realistic aspirations particularly in non-traditional sectors
SCHOOL #15

Judged by Ofsted as Outstanding, the school has a high number of Pupil Premium students. Boys outnumber the girls at the school. There is good careers provision and support but currently provision in Years 7 and 8 is quite ad hoc. The school has identified the borderline C/D students as a priority.

SCHOOL #16

A Secondary School for Boys in the Edgbaston district of Birmingham. Pupils are from a diverse range of backgrounds and currently pupil performance is judged as below national average. This would provide a good opportunity for an Enterprise Adviser to make a significant impact.

The proportion of pupils from minority ethnic backgrounds, and those who speak English as an additional language, is above the national average

The school is keen to improve the aspiration of students by challenging traditional pupil pathways and stereotypes around careers, e.g. boys into nursing. Promoting Apprenticeships is a priority as well as raising awareness of construction/engineering
sectors.

SCHOOL #17

A smaller than the average-sized secondary school requiring improvement in the central area of Birmingham. Nearly all students are from ethnic minority groups. 55% of the pupils come from non-working families and carry with them the notion of worklessness.
Priorities include:
• Raising aspirations with younger pupils
• Embedding careers through the curriculum
• Working with parents
• Staff CPD

SCHOOL #18

A large comprehensive school in central area of Birmingham, judged by Ofsted as Outstanding.
The school leads a federation which comprises a primary school and an all-through special school, which caters for disabled pupils with profound and severe special educational needs. All three schools occupy the same purpose-built building.

Almost all pupils are from minority ethnic groups and there is a higher than national proportion of pupils known to be eligible for the pupil premium, at 65% compared with 16% nationally.

The school would like to focus on raising aspirations in Year 9, possibly with a focus on Apprenticeships

SCHOOL #19

A fully comprehensive, high-performing 11-16 Academy in South-East Birmingham for learners of all abilities. With approximately 900 students on roll, it is a Fully Accessible Mainstream School with a long tradition of catering for physically disabled children.

It is a diverse school in every sense. As well as a Disability ‘specialism’, it is multi-ethnic with approximately 55% of the student body coming from homes where English may not be the first spoken language. 38% of young people attract Pupil Premium funding. A majority of students live within walking distance of the school.

Priorities include:
• Follow up sessions to careers fairs – more in depth exploration
• CV workshop with Employers
• Self-Employment
• Labour Market Information
• Encouraging girls into STEM
• Focus on medical, teaching, creative while raising awareness of opportunities in other sectors.

 

SCHOOL #20

A Catholic School of about 1000 pupils, including a sixth form, in the Sutton Coldfield area of Birmingham, judged by Ofsted as Good. The school has a lower than average intake of pupils of minority ethnic heritage.

Aligned to its Catholic ethos the school looks at careers in terms of vocation and not simply employment. The school is currently looking at alternatives to work experience introducing different ways for pupils to engage with employers and the workplace.

SCHOOL #21

A Smaller than average 11–18 Academy in the Highgate area of Birmingham judged as Outstanding by Ofsted. Almost all pupils come from minority ethnic groups and the large majority speak English as an additional language. Three quarters of pupils are eligible for pupil premium, which provides additional funding for looked after children and those known to be eligible for free school meals. The proportion of disadvantaged pupils is therefore well above the national average. The majority of the academy’s pupils are boys and in some year groups only 30% are girls.

Careers education is well established and the current coordinator is looking to train a younger member of staff to take on more careers’ responsibilities. The Enterprise Adviser could have a key role in supporting this member of staff with a specific focus on Key Stage 3 (11 – 14 year olds). No specific sector requested.

For more details, please contact Enterprise Coordinator Hilary Smyth-Allen

hilary@bpsbirmingham.co.uk